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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 700 (some duplicates have been removed)
winning journalist david cohen presents his book columbine. the comprehensive account that took place in ninth. it's about forty minutes. dave cohen who are eric and dylan. >> the two killers at columbine. >> and eric was a psychopath and dylan was not. they were completely different people. and, you know, as i spent ten years on the book, and the question i get asked most often is why do d they do it. it took me a year to figure out it's in the wrong question. there's eric why he did it and there's dialynn. they are different people. do you want to talk about each one? eric was a psychopath. >> eric harris? >> yes. he was the mastermind of the plot. he spent a couple of years trying to figure out how he could destroy the entire world. that was his "fantasy" as a 16-year-old boy. wipe out humanitarian. only leave three or four or five people. the power of life as well as death makes it more powerful. a god can give life as well as take it away. and they are not delusional where they think there is god. there's a important of god. it's referred to the messiah complex. the key to them i
" and later the author of "columbine" and what we have learned from that tragedy and how it applies to the shooting in connecticut. >> i called on congress today to act immediately on what is appropriate to put armed police officers in every single school in this nation. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] >> the headline in this morning's baltimore sun reflects those across the country. from the tribune's washington magazine, it's said when he weight in friday he delivered a lashing speech that included violent movies and video games as he said his plan would train those to guard our schools. in this edition of today's program, we're going to begin the first 45 minutes of the program to talk about the nra's response to the shootings. they broke their silence yesterday with executive director and vice president wayne. we'll talk more about what he had to say. but we want to get you involved in the conversation. so the numbers on your screen. guest: we also have a special line this morning for members of the
shootings in 19 -- columbine shootings from 1999 and joins us in washington. rich, thank u for being here. this is a horrific investigation. first, it's tough to even deal with to start the investigation for experts who have been talking about this all day. they said it's tough to even do it. once you get in to it, what are they doing from the beginning to begin their looking in to this guy and starting the evidentiary gathering? >> guest: i never thought once again in my entire career i'd go through another incident similar to columbine. the entire bureau and the law enforcement members are just saddened and send our sympathies out to the families. we as an agency with atf and the partners are so commit to make sure that we come up with a motive and come up with every answer to try to ascertain how this event happened. what they will be going the next 24 hours which is extremely important is to identify the victims with the medical examiner. they will also be conducting many tests, forensic tests on the weapons, the ballistics evidence, checking the different locations where the offender
in the columbine high school mass shooting, she said today, "as far as the parents go, they're not going to know what hit them for a long, long time. my heart is racing. i just feel like these parents, they're going to hurt so bad for so long. and there is not much you can do to console something like this." frank deangelis was the principal of columbine high school when the shooting happened. frank deangelis still is the principal there today. he said when he heard what happened in connecticut today, quote, it just made me sick to my stomach. it just takes me back to what we felt on april 20th, 1999. even though it's going to be 14 years, it just takes us back to that horrific day. and dave cullen, who wrote the definitive book on the columbine mass shooting, he said today, "in my head i have always insisted that any death is just as tragic. but little kids, this is overwhelming me." we're going to be covering the latest news out of newtown, connecticut this hour. and there is new news. law enforcement officers say that the weapons used in today's shootings were legally purchased by the gunman'
at columbine. 13 years later, barry petersen reports the wounds there have still not healed. >> reporter: it was april 20, 1999. two heavily armed columbine students walked into their school and opened fire. they killed 12 students and one teacher before killing themselves. have you ever actually recovered from this? >> no. i mean -- >> reporter: still haunts you? >> yeah, it does. >> reporter: frank de angelis was the principal that day as he is today at columbine. what went through your mind when you heard about what happened in connecticut? you've been there. >> i was in a state of shock. immediately my heart was just broken and kind of nauseous, to be honest with you. >> reporter: his first thoughts were of the agonizing moments as the news spread. >> the thing that weighs on my mind is when parents are waiting in a room and students are not coming to them as the other parents receive their kids. and i'm sure every parent who is in connecticut today when they heard the news were wondering if that child, their child, was in that classroom. >> reporter: feelings that flooded back this
is the age of the children. >> i don't think there is any doubt about that. i was at columbine for at least i think it was probably two weeks. at that time we had not seen anything like what we saw there. and there was a lot of conversation at that point about how do we stop this from happening again. well, 12, 13 years later i was back in aurora, colorado and talking to many of the same people that i had sadly gotten to know during the columbine shootings. and then earlier in the year i was in arizona when gabby giffords and the others were shot there. and you do have a sense everywhere you go, obviously, that there is a senselessness to it, there is a lack of understanding, that no amount of information that we get about the shooter can truly help us to understand how someone could do this. but there is a heaviness here that is almost undescribable, ed. and i think it is related to the fact that we're looking at these young, innocent children that if a shooter goes into a elementary school and opens fire on a classroom, he knows that the victims are going to be children who should by all ri
la historia del pas, superando la de columbine... el padre jon pedigo siente que el incidente se presta para reflexionar. cu - peluffo outro autoridades dieron a conocer que las armas utilizadas por el pistolero estaban regristradas a nombre de la madre, una de las vctimas de esta masacre. este es mi informe, regreso con ustedes.. blanca --- pero, que puede producir que alguien cometa un acto criminal de la magnitud como el que se vivio hoy.... stop open roll open take 2 box --continuamos con nuestra cobertura en equipo, angel ayllon entrevisto a profesionales de la salud mental para conocer un poco los posibles perfiles del asesino. --angel buenas tardes roll open buenas tardes, aun las autoridades no han confirmado si el hombre que ingreso al colegio de primaria y cometio los macabros asesinatos, tenia algun problema de tipo mental... y de ahi viene la inquietud sobre como conocer y como prevenir mentes que puedan llegar a tanta crueldad ---el presidente obama hablo ante la nacion luego de esta masacre... take 4 seconds nats ---al borde de las lagrimas, el mandatario mostro sus
. after columbine. one of the changes in dealing with law enforcements, as in columbine they waited a minute to assess what was going o. and the protocall is you go in and try to get to the shooter as soon as possible. and that meeps the first guys in there are putting their in harm's ways. a crime like this is usual lie done within five minutes. you don't have time to assess. you assess on the run so yeah, you don't know what is on the other side. you work out a plan before hand and you are analyzing your strat strat on -- strategy on the run. 24 hours passed before the bodies were removed and a lot of intense forensic work was going on. help us to understand, what is it that the police are doing behind the closed doors, obviously no cameras are going in there and no one will get in there is it evaporate that you tabe your crime scene. it was a contained crime 69 and behind the scenes, they are looking at the process in the crime scene and forepsics that they are recovering. matching those rounds to the gun. the most important thing if you are finding a round. and no gun. is there
for columbine high school. >> reporter: columbine took four months to reopen after 12 people were gunned down and ten were injured. they demolished the library and replaced it with a sunny atrium. after a gunman killed 32 people at virginia tech, parts of campus went through extensive renovations and gradually reopened. but sandy hook is unprecedented, because the victims were so young. >> they make sense of things differently. they might be more clingy. they might regress more, so they might start sucking their thumb, for example. >> reporter: the new campus is being outfitted with a new security system. officials promised it will be the safest school in america. a pledge parents the use to reassure their children and themselves. for "nightline," i'm juju chang in newtown, connecticut. >>> coming up next, from selling off shares to stripping shelves, how this tragedy is changing the game, at least for now, for those who make, sell, and invest in the booming business of guns. [ male announcer ] red lobster's crabfest ends soon. hurry in and try five succulent entrees, like our tender snow cra
of "bowling for columbine," response to the sandy hook massacre. >> there are crazy people and there are shootings and killings in norway and france and germany, but there hasn't been 61 mass killings like there have been in this country to a sense columbine. >> and the nra facebook page has gone dark. we will speak with lisa graves about big guns and big money. all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. residents of newtown, connecticut, have begun holding the first of many kernels for the 27 victims killed in friday's shooting rampage at sandy hook elementary school. on monday, noah pozner and jack pinto, 06 years old, were laid to rest in small caskets. more funerals are slated today including two more 6-year-old victim's, james mattioli and jessica rekos. at the white house, president obama convened a meeting with top officials to discuss ways to respond to the newtown massacre, including potential proposals for gun control. pressed for details, white house press secretary jay carney reduced off
of the worst, of course, columbine high school in colorado. dave cullen spent ten years writing and researching about that massacre and joins us now. dave, thank you for being here. i guess your book came out about columbine ten years after the tragedy and the most eye opening thing about what you're reporting found was that all of the -- everything we thought we knew about columbine in the first week, two months and months after it happened was basically false and a lot of false narratives. and you basically searched for a sort of satisfying motive that we could all understand and you couldn't really find one. i wonder based of your experience if there are lessons to keep in mind piecing together what happened here in newtown in the weeks ahead. >> sure. there are a whole lot of lessons. one thing is that the media is pretty good in getting the facts right and there's always confusion in the beginning, especially the first hours and awful things like how many people have been killed and logistical things but it sorts itself out pretty quickly and normally the facts we do pretty well with. that
inició ante la masacre de columbine. >>pero este maestro no piensa que esto lo salve >>la mochila es una herramienta, esto también lo es sin un sistema que te enseñe como y cuando usarla, es solo una parte del rompecabezas >>mientras que los colegios entrenen a los adultos, se seguirán repitiendo estos ataques >>los niños serán más seguros si enseñamos a los maestros a identificar ciertas cosas. >>estos centros del saber no volverán a ser lo que eran. >en instantes mienstra barack obama propone medidas para el control de armas, el gobernador de texas dice todo lo contrario. envienos sus ♪. el presidente barack obama anuncio la creacion de una propuesta para controlar la venta de armas en el país. >>mientras en el país aumena la compra de armas, en texas el gobernador habla de armar a los profesores permitir armas en las aulas >>el gobernador dice que las leyes de su estado permite a una persona lleva un arma a cualquier lado siempre que cumpla con los permisos para tenerla en las ultimas 24 horas tenemos cientos de profesores registrados >>dice que la idea es que si un hombre
. columbine was one indication of things that schools need to be looking at. i think after this, they will be looked at in more broad fashion. >> what it tells me, they tried to do everything they could to stop something like this from happening. can we ever do enough? >> we all would like to do enough and save every life there is. however, security can never be hundred percent. we are trying get to a point we are preventing adversary and delaying an adversary from getting to a certain point. for the time, to be asking what the school is doing and right for that type of school. now, we see dynamics have chged and this the type of incident we need to be looking at it differently. >> heather: you just referenced that parents all across the country watching this unfold, they have to send their little children to school on monday. "a", how do they do that and "b" what do they ask 'your schools about security? >> it must be very difficult. any small child off to school after what we saw what happened yesterday. one of the things that parents can do. they would like to do something po
columbine shooting in 1999. these events are all too familiar from them. up next the perspective from the principal of columbine high school. >> it is close to home and just makes us realize how vulnerable we are as a society. note snote the ♪ >> the tragedy in connecticut hitting close to home for survivors of the columbine high school shooting in colorado. a reporter talked with school leaders there and parents who were there in 1999. >> just like to start off by just offering our condolences and prayers to the people in connecticut. >> kelly: doing his best to fight back tears, frank deangelus talked about shock and sadness. >> close to home and just making us realize how vulnerable we are as a society. >> kelly: it was almost 14 years ago when two gunman entered columbine and slaughtered 13 students and to deangelus, the connecticut elementary school has entered a clib. >> we have to stand up and saying enough is enough what is wrong with our society. and again, there's not one right answer. >> reporter: this principal believes a lot of lessons learned. but the answer does not
than one shooter. and those people may not have all of the information. after columbine. one of the changes in dealing with law enforcements, as in columbine they waited a minute to assess what was going o. and the protocall is you go in and try to get to the shooter as soon as possible. and that meeps the first guys in there are putting their in harm's ways. a crime like this is usual lie done within five minutes. you don't have time to assess. you assess on the run so yeah, you don't know what is on the other side. you work out a plan before hand and you are analyzing your strat strat on -- strategy on the run. 24 hours passed before the bodies were removed and a lot of intense forensic work was going on. help us to understand, what is it that the police are doing behind the closed doors, obviously no cameras are going in there and no one will get in there is it evaporate that you tabe your crime scene. it was a contained crime 69 and behind the scenes, they are looking at the process in the crime scene and forepsics that they are recovering. matching those rounds to the gu
of the 1999 columbine shoot this is colorado. then two students killed 12 schoolmates and a teacher. that attack forced police to rethink their response to school shootings. and we asked wyatt andrews to tell us how those police tactics have changed. >> reporter: when the police first arrived at the sandy hook school, their standing orders were, without hesitation, to go straight inside and confront the gunman. connecticut state police lieutenant paul vance. >> newtown police immediately upon arrival entered the school and began a complete active shooter search of the building. that included checking every door, every crack, sr *ef visio, every portion of that school. >> reporter: that phrase begin active search means do not wait. it's a reaction to the columbine massacre 13 years ago when dozens of officers waited 46 minutes outside as the shooting continued and at least one victim bled to death. captain drew tracey, then with the montgomery county police in maryland, was incensed by columbine and helped invent the active shooter tactics used today. >> we have to go where we hear t
son survived the columbine massacre. a >> you are watching "fox & friends" and it is now 5:00, half past 5:00. we are learning more about tragedy. it took just minutes to murder 20 children and six faculty. they started like any other day, at 9:30 classes begin. teachers and fab ultimate were gathered and the rips -- principal and the psychologist rushed to the hour. the shooter opened fire and they were the first victims. the nightmare played out over the we loudspeaker where the school heard the chaos. after that the calls for help started. >> we have multiple weapons including a rifle. >> we neat help. >> the newtown police arrived at 9:50 and at 10:23 they entered, going room to room. he was found dead inside a choose room. that is when the officers began to move students and staff out. frantic parents and other loved ones rushed to the scene hoping to fine their children safe and sound. >> this is no word, no word. it is terror. and a sense of immediate urgency and you have for get to your child and to be there to protect them. >> later in the day at 3:17, president obama, wipi
was going to say. this is not the first school shooting that we've had to endure. think about columbine and the school shootings here in new york city and washington d.c., in chicago. places all over the country. it was students. people prone to students in the student body. this is a high school. this is an elementary school. this is apparently clearly someone from the outside coming in last night elementary school must be that, and this is what's so chilling about what's happening here today in connecticut. >> clint, i want to go to you before we have to go to break, but in terms of the reverse 911 call, do you have any details on how that happened, that we know that the first 911 call was made at about 9:40, 9:41. the school then seemed to alert students who might still be home or were not yet at school or their parents about what was happening. do we have any more details on that? >> no. you know, that's been a very -- that's been a very good system for the schools, for colleges to be able for parents to subscribe to that service to let everyone know. in america we have about 285 mi
. the columbine tragedy, it didn't stop the carnage. >> there were armed guards there and they didn't go in. they were under orders that if something happened they were to call the police for backup. >> they exchanged fires with the shooters. >> they waited for the s.w.a.t. team to show up and the s.w.a.t. team sat outside and tried to figure out what to do. every procedure has been changed since columbine as a result of that. >> they exchanged fire with the shooters. your principle of having armed guard was the true at columbine, was it not? >> they've changed every police procedure since columbine. i don't understand why you can't just for a minute imagine that when that horrible monster tried to shoot his way into sandy hook school that if a good guy with a gun had been there, he might have been able to stop him. >> i'm just trying to test your views here, mr. lapierre about how it would actually work. how many do you think you have to have on campus and where? is it sufficient to have them at the front of the school? >> that's up to our police. our police do this every day. they protect
of the tragic ironies of the timing of the columbine massacre, it was just a sad coincidence, was that the national rifle association, the nra, was holding their annual convention a week later in colorado. in denver, colorado, only about a 20-minute drive from where the columbine massacre happened. the nra said they would not cancel their conference because of columbine, but they did scale it down to a one-day event. it had been planned to be a three-day thing. and in response to the tragedy at columbine and the awful coincidence of the nra conference that was being planned for just a few days after the shooting the nra put out a statement in the form of a letter to its members that said, "our spirits must endure this terrible suffering together and so must the freedoms that bring us together. we must stand in unshakeable unity, even in this time of anguish." about a week after that an nra spokesman said it really was "not the most appropriate time and place to debate public policy." so not a good time to talk about policy. that was the nra's response to columbine. fast-forwa
mother whose daughter died and her son survived the columbine massacre. [ male announcer ] this is joe woods' first day of work. and his new boss told him two things -- cook what you love, and save your money. joe doesn't knowt yet, but he'll work his way up from busser to waiter to chef before opening a restaurant specializing in fish and game from the great northwest. he'll start investing early, he'll find some good people to help guide him, and he'll set money aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. at legalzoom, we've created a better place to handle your legal needs. maybe you have questions about incorporating a business you'd like to start. or questions about protecting your family with a will or living trust. and you'd like to find the right attorney to help guide you along, answer any questions and offer advice. with an "a" rating from the better business bureau legalzoom helps you get personalized and affordable legal protection. in most states, a legal plan attorney is available with every persona
. >> columbine right now here at sandy hook elementary. with every school shooting, every parent thinks, it could have been my child, god forbid. what can we do to save children's lives down the road? much more of our special coverage right after this. >>> we have just been told that the secretary of state hillary clinton has suffered a concussion. a statement released by the state department, i'll just read it to you. here it is. and our foreign affairs secretary releasing this statement. while suffering from a stop mass virus, secretary clinton became dehydrated and fainted sustaining a concussion. she has been recovering at home and will continue to be monitored regularly by her doctors. she will continue to work from home next week staying in regular contact with officials. she's looking forward to being back in office soon. dr. sanjay gupta, a neurosurgeon himself, he's here. sanjay, she's obviously not feeling well. she must have fallen, i assume, hit her head, and suffers a concussion? >> yeah. the first thing -- the fainting preceded the concussion. one of the most common things is you ha
there was an armed security officer at the columbine high school the day of that 1999 massacre, and they say controlling gun violence requires a package of solutions beyond the schoolhouse door. barbara starr, cnn, washington. >> barbara, thank you. the brady campaign to prevent gun violence weighed in on the current debate. they released a statement from a father whose 8-year-old son was saved from bullets by a courageous teacher at sandy hook elementary. he writes, our hearts are heavy this holiday in newtown. nothing will bring our children back or ease the pain we all feel. but we can do something to make this nation safer. we can make this the nation we all want. so today i want to speak specifically to all responsible gun owners and nra members with the message to join us. join us because you know in your heart that we are better than this. hope you're listening. >>> coming up in 30 minutes here, i'm going to talk to ken trump. he says calls for arming teachers, making kids wear bulletproof backpacks, and teaching kids to attacked armed intruders is borderline insane. that's at 7:30 ea
of the other dark days -- columbine, tucson, aurora. abc's senior justice correspondent pierre thomas now tells us what the experts say they see when they look at the men behind these massacres. >> reporter: the virginia tech massacre, 32 dead. a shooting spree in tucson, arizona -- six dead. 12 killed at a colorado movie theater. mass murder conducted by lone gunmen. but who are these men? and what motivates them? >> we're talking about attacks that are carried out largely by people who are not necessarily psychopathic, not sociopathic, but folks who are relatively normal, but at a point of absolute desperation. >> reporter: according to one estimate, this year alone, there have been 15 mass shootings with at least 84 people killed before today. in the 61 mass murders carried out since 1982, all but one of the 43 shooters were male. most were white and the average age of the primary shooter was 35. nearly half of the mass murders have involved school or workplace shootings. but in recent years, shopping malls, restaurants, and houses of worship have also come under fire. >> mass shooters tend
, movie theater. in each case, the shooters showed psychotic behavior. 13 people were killed in columbine. one was a textbook psychopath and we know now he even laughed while gunning down his victims. looking back, none of them had snapped. they had all left clues pieced together after it was too late. hindsight. we still don't know much about this shooter that lived in this home but there is something else to consider, what medications, if any, he was on. i'm specifically talking about antidepressants. if you look at how other shootings like this have happened, medications were a common factor. i want to be clear, not that antidepressants can't be effective but there's a vulnerable time between when someone starts and stops these medications, could lead to decreased judgment and making someone out of touch. none of this is an execution and it's never just one thing. none of these behaviors will fully predict or explain why. but soon again there will be hindsight that might just help prevent another tragedy. in a seven-year period there were 181 episodes of drug side effects. often it was
. other behaviors obsessed with guns or prior shooters like the columbine or the aurora shooter and as it gets closer to the events. it would become, they would become involved with just really focusing on their planning and how they're going to carry it out. now, someone clear across town, are they going to be aware of these warning behaviors? absolutely not. but is it someone that's going to be close to the shootser that will become aware that these behaviors are starting to manifest and bubble to the top? those are the people we want to come forward and say, i'm concerned about this, this is really more atypical. this person is becoming, is making threats and the warning behaviors are beginning to surface. we had a case very recently where the rather came forward to law enforcement and was concerned about her son because he had threatened to go into a movie theater and carry out a shooting similar to aurora, colorado so we know that these warning behaviors work when you identify them and you don't ignore them. >> dave: and i remember all the way back to the columbine, i was t
to quite a few of the columbine survivors yesterday who were having really, really rough days in different ways. it pulls that together and then of course the same questions that we're asking with everyone wanting to know he why and we made a lot of mistakes in that case of jumping too quickly to why. i think the press is much better now at understanding to be more cautious about these things but still a desire to understand why this happened and how it fits into this wider picture of why all of these shootings. >> is there anything that -- with between all of the shootings, the suspects, is there anything that resonates with you about detecting signs that a person is about to commit such a horrific crime or do these people sometimes just snap? >> yeah, that's a great question. they definitely don't snap. that's a word we should actually try to take out of our vocabulary. in almost all cases it's a very slow build. the secret service did a remarkable study of all of the cases of school shooters over a 25-year period and the vast majority plan them in advance. many for weeks and months in a
. columbine survivors talk about how they got through their tragedy in 1999. people have doubts about taking aspirin for pain. but they haven't experienced extra strength bayer advanced aspirin. in fact, in a recent survey, 95% of people who tried it agreed that it relieved their headache fast. visit fastreliefchallenge.com today for a special trial offer. since ameriprise financial was founded back in 1894, they've been committed to putting clients first. helping generations through tough times. good times. never taking a bailout. there when you need them. helping millions of americans over the centuries. the strength of a global financial leader. the heart of a one-to-one relationship. together for your future. ♪ to take a centrum silver multivitamin every day. i told him, sure. can't hurt, right? then i heard this news about a multivitamin study looking at long-term health benefits for men over 50. the one they used in that study... centrum silver. that's what i take. my doctor! he knows his stuff. [ male announcer ] centrum. the most recommended. most preferred. most studied. centrum,
like virginia tech or columbine joining me now is pastor rocky veach who was living near littleton, colorado, when the columbine situation occurred. he now lives here in connecticut what do you say for families who come to you and people in this community who weren't even having a loved one at that school but who just -- everybody feels affected. what do you say? >> yeah, as a christian, what can you say to start with? but as a christian, you tell them, there's hope in the lord. god knows where you're at. god cares for you and loves you. rather than saying a lot about jesus, trying to be like jesus. that is what i'm trying to do >> it seems, too, a lot of times just being there is important and listening is as important as what you say. >> yeah, very much so. that's what anybody needs in this kind of setting. and having been in this setting a time before, and actually i'm glad to be around to be able to help people here. >> you feel like you're in the right place at the right time. >> yeah, right place at the right time. and the church that i pastor, i think they feel that way, too
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 700 (some duplicates have been removed)